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Vivaldi Four Seasons: complete, original version. Voices of Music, Freivogel, Moore, Youssefian. 4K

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Vivaldi's Four Seasons, performed on original instruments by the award winning Early Music Ensemble Voices of Music. Please subscribe to our channel 🤍 Cynthia Miller Freivogel, Carla Moore & Alana Youssefian, soloists. Voices of Music Hanneke van Proosdij & David Tayler , directors These concertos were individually performed live in our concerts from 2015–2018, using a similar recording setup. Audience noise and applause have been removed in this version in preparation for an album release of the full version. You can also view the concerts with applause as a playlist here: 🤍 The subtitles in this video were written 300 years ago in the form of a sonnet, presumably by Vivaldi, and engraved directly onto the music. You may view the original Italian or an English translation by using the CC button. Of all of Vivaldi’s concertos, the Four Seasons are the most widely performed of his works today. Vivaldi managed to change the course of music history by writing these four concertos; composers had set the seasons, the hours, the months and many other programs of music in the 17th century, but no one had written a set like the Four Seasons. Vivaldi did not just create a new kind of musical program, he refined the way in which all of the elements of the program work with the music, and he spun his programmatic flourishes over a very detailed harmonic and contrapuntal plan. Composers had previously written music that shivered with the cold, created storms and winds, imitated birds, and so on, but not to the extent and not with the careful planning of these concertos. Vivaldi provided a detailed commentary for his work in the form of individual sonnets keyed exactly to different movements in the music, along with tempo indications, ornaments and articulation marks (please see the text and translations opposite the program). It’s an interesting question as to how to interpret Vivaldi’s design, and part of the charm of the works is that the program is very clear, yet the possibilities are endless: the main challenge is to choose between a mimetic and allegorical interpretation. In a mimetic interpretation, the performers would use extended techniques on their instruments to imitate as directly as possible the sounds of the program, including chattering teeth, raindrops, wind and stamping feet. In an allegorical performance, the players would play in such a way as to allow the listeners to use their imaginations to freely recreate the program: each musical line could convey a different layer of meaning. Similarly, by using different textures and phrasing in each of the musical lines as well the different sections, the performers can build up a tapestry of textures, without necessarily pushing each texture too far. It’s clear from contemporaneous accounts that a purely mimetic performance was frowned upon as too obvious, yet it is also clear that in Italy and Germany, string players were inventing new techniques to include a wider variety of sounds in their playing. Thus, it is quite possible to read the words “raindrops” and create a new, imaginative musical version of a rainy, wind-swept landscape without presenting the music pre-interpreted for the viewer. Spring: Allegro - 0:00 Largo - 3:32 Allegro - 6:13 Summer: Allegro non molto - 10:09 Adagio - 15:31 Presto - 17:46 Autumn: Allegro - 20:42 Adagio molto - 26:14 Allegro - 28:25 Winter: Allegro non molto - 31:56 Largo - 35:29 Allegro - 37:25 Credits 40:44 #Vivaldi #FourSeasons

Bach: Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 in G Major BWV 1048, complete, Voices of Music 4K UHD video

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11.09.2014

For the first time in 4K Ultra High Definition video, Bach's Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 in G Major (BWV 1048), complete, performed on original instruments by the Early Music ensemble Voices of Music. Please subscribe to our channel 🤍 In March of 1721, Johann Sebastian Bach carefully inked six of his best concertos into a book for the Margrave of Brandenburg, Christian Ludwig. The original title, "Six Concerts à plusieurs instruments" is now known as the "Brandenburg" Concertos in English or "Brandenburgische Konzerte" in German. These six concertos represent the summa of chamber music in the high baroque period, and the third concerto (BWV 1048) is noted for its rich texture of three violins, three violas and three cellos, with a continuo part for the harpsichord and violone. The original title is as follows: "Concerto 3zo [terzo] a tre Violini, tre Viole, è tre Violoncelli col Basso per il Cembalo". On the continuo part, Bach has written "Violone & Cembalo", and this is how it is performed in the video, just as it is indicated in the original manuscript. Brandenburg III makes an appearance in Season 6, Episode 19 “Lessons” of Star Trek: The Next Generation, as well as the episode "A Matter of Time." This concerto is part of the Voices of Music Great Works project. A Creative Commons edition of the score, based on the composer's manuscript, will be published to accompany the complete recording, and the recording will be available worldwide on Blu-Ray and CD, and for free on MP3 and high-definition, 24 bit FLAC files. Buy CDs 🤍 I. (Allegro) 0:00 II. Adagio 5:34 III. Allegro 5:45 Voices of Music Hanneke van Proosdij & David Tayler, directors #Bach #BrandenburgConcerto #BWV1048 #TNG

Vivaldi Four Seasons: Winter (L'Inverno), original version. Freivogel & Voices of Music RV 297 4K

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10.04.2016

Vivaldi Winter! The complete concerto performed on original instruments. Please subscribe to our channel 🤍 Welcome #wednesday fans :) Soundtrack on iTunes 🤍 All Four Seasons now online! 🤍 Buy Cds 🤍 Vivaldi's Concerto for violin and strings in F Minor, "Winter" (L'Inverno, RV 297), the original version is best! Cynthia Miller Freivogel, baroque violin and the award winning Early Music ensemble Voices of Music. Voices of Music is creating a worldwide digital library of music videos, recordings and editions, free for anyone in the world. To support this vital project, which will enable new generations of people all around the world to enjoy Classical music, please consider a tax-deductible donation or sponsor a recording project. With your help, anything is possible! 🤍 Voices of Music continues our groundbreaking work as a pioneer in the new field of Ultra-High definition video. Although the Four Seasons is the most recorded work in Classical music, this is the first time that the work is made freely available in this format, and performed on period instruments. Your donations will keep the presses running! Voices of Music and the instruments in this video Hanneke van Proosdij & David Tayler, directors Maria Caswell, baroque viola, anonymous, Mittenwald, c1800 Cynthia Miller Freivogel, baroque violin by Johann Paul Schorn, Salzburg, Austria, 1715 Lisa Grodin, baroque violin by Paulo Antonio Testore, Larga di Milano, Italy, 1736 Katherine Heater, baroque organ by Winold van der Putten, Finsterwolde, Netherlands, 2004, after early 18th-century northern German instruments Carla Moore, baroque violin by Johann Georg Thir, Vienna, Austria, 1754 Maxine Nemerovski, baroque violin by Joseph Gaffino, Paris, 1769 Farley Pearce, violone by George Stoppani, Manchester, 1985, after Amati, 1560 Hanneke van Proosdij, Italian single manual harpsichord by Johannes Klinkhamer, Amsterdam, 2000, after Cristofori, Florence, c1725 Elisabeth Reed, baroque cello, anonymous, 1673 David Tayler, archlute by Andreas von Holst, Munich, 2012 after Magno Tieffenbrucker, Venice, c1610 Tanya Tomkins, baroque cello, Lockey Hill, London, England, 1798 Gabrielle Wunsch, baroque violin by Lorenzo Carcassi, Florence, Italy, 1765 0:00 Allegro non molto 3:31 Largo 5:28 Allegro 9:24 Credits #Vivaldi #FourSeasons #wednesdayaddams

Handel: As steals the morn (L'Allegro, HWV 55) Amanda Forsythe & Thomas Cooley, Voices of Music 4K

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04.11.2019

One of Handel's finest arias, As steals the morn upon the night, performed on original instruments by the Early Music ensemble Voices of Music. Presented for the first time in 4K, ultra high definition videofrom our award winning concert "As steals the Morn," March, 2019. This concert placed first in the SFCV "Best of the Bay" awards, 2018-2019. Amanda Forsythe and Thomas Cooley, soloists. Marc Schachman and Anna Marsh, baroque oboe & bassoon. Please subscribe to our channel 🤍 In memoriam Edward W. Tayler (1931-2018) As steals the morn upon the night, And melts the shades away: So Truth does Fancy’s charm dissolve, And rising Reason puts to flight The fumes that did the mind involve, Restoring intellectual day. —William Shakespeare, John Milton & Charles Jennens “As steals the morn” shows Handel at his very best as a composer: he employs full, rich counterpoint throughout the aria, and he provides extended melismas for the soprano and tenor voices as well as the oboe and bassoon. The text was originally drawn from Shakespeare’s Tempest: (aside) “The charm dissolves apace, And as the morning steals upon the night, Melting the darkness, so their rising senses Begin to chase the ignorant fumes that mantle Their clearer reason... (Act 5, Scene 1) The play as a whole (and these lines in particular) was widely imitated in the baroque period, in this case, by Milton, and later by Handel and his librettist, Charles Jennens. L’Allegro premiered in February of 1740. The original cast was soprano Elisabeth Duparc (‘La Francesina’) a boy treble, tenor John Beard, and basses Henry Reinhold and William Savage. Text: As steals the morn upon the night, And melts the shades away: So Truth does Fancy's charm dissolve, And rising Reason puts to flight The fumes that did the mind involve, Restoring intellectual day. #Handel #Milton #Shakespeare

Air on the G String (Suite No. 3, BWV 1068) J. S. Bach, original instruments

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24.07.2013

The second movement, Aria, from Bach's orchestral suite in D Major, BWV 1068, performed on original instruments from the time of Bach by the Early Music ensemble Voices of Music. Please subscribe to our channel 🤍 Buy CDs🤍 Voices of Music FAQ Q. How can I support Voices of Music? A. Donate here: 🤍 and we will make more videos like this one :) Voices of Music Hanneke van Proosdij & David Tayler, directors The musicians and their instruments Carla Moore, baroque violin by Johann Georg Thir, Vienna, Austria, 1754 Maxine Nemerovski, baroque violin by Timothy Johnson, Indiana, 1999 (after Stradivarius) Elizabeth Blumenstock, baroque violin by Andrea Guarneri, Cremona, 1660 Kati Kyme, baroque violin by Johann Gottlob Pfretzschner, Mittenwald, 1791 Lisa Grodin, baroque viola by Mathias Eberl, Salzburg, Austria, 1680 William Skeen, five string baroque cello, Anonymous, Italy, c1680 Farley Pearce, violone by George Steppani, Manchester, 1985, after Amati, 1560 David Tayler, archlute by Andreas von Holst, Munich, 2012 after Magno Tieffenbrucker, Venice, c1610 Hanneke van Proosdij, baroque organ by Winold van der Putten, Finsterwolde, Netherlands, 2004, after early 18th-century northern German instruments #Bach #AirontheGString

Michael Praetorius: Dances from Terpsichore; Voices of Music 4K UHD

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13.09.2017

A suite from the early baroque dance collection Terpsichore (1612) by Michael Praetorius. Live, 4K UHD video from the Early Music ensemble Voices of Music concert, December, 2016. Please subscribe to our channel 🤍 For this concert, we selected six dances from the collection and grouped them together to form a suite: Ballet, 0:00 Courante 1:47 Spagnoletta 3:11 Volte 5:12 Pavane 6:10 Bourée 7:40 Buy Voices of Music CDs 🤍 Michael Praetorius was one of the most important composers and theorists of the late renaissance and early-17th century. His astonishing encyclopedia of music gives us an intriguing glimpse into the instruments and performance practices of the time, and his writing covers all aspects of music. Praetorius wrote popular hymn settings, as well as large-scale compositions that borrowed elements of the polychoral Italian tradition. Praetorius was a tune collector, just like the musicologists of the late 19th and early 20th centuries who collected songs and dances from different countries; he planned eight volumes of these secular works, but he only finished one: his book of French instrumental dances Terpsichore, named after the muse of dance (1612). Orchestration: in the 1960s and 1970s, these works were heavily orchestrated—and conducted—in a neo-renaissance style. Although not grounded in historical performance, these orchestrations did, however, introduce a wider audience to the different kinds of instruments in the late renaissance and early baroque and helped popularize the music before Bach. In our performance, we have used strings as the foundation, as this was one of the most popular ways to perform dance music, and added winds, continuo and percussion. Voices of Music Hanneke van Proosdij and David Tayler Directors Musicians (left to right) Hanneke van Proosdij, recorder, organ & harpsichord Carla Moore, Gabrielle Wunsch, Lisa Grodin and Maxine Nemerovski, baroque violins Maria Caswell, baroque viola Peter Maund, percussion Elisabeth Reed and Tanya Tomkins, baroque cellos Farley Pearce, violone David Tayler, archlute & percussion

Handel: Sweet Bird (L'Allegro). Amanda Forsythe, Emi Ferguson & Voices of Music 4K

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31.07.2019

The aria "Sweet Bird" from Handel's L'Allegro, il Penseroso ed il Moderato HWV 55. Amanda Forsythe, soprano, Emi Ferguson, baroque flute. Live, 4K ultra high definition video from our "As steals the morn" concert, March, 2019. Please subscribe to our channel 🤍 NB: During filming, birds gathered outside the window and started singing! You can hear them in the video. Buy CDs 🤍 L’Allegro premiered in February of 1740. The original cast was soprano Elisabeth Duparc (‘La Francesina’) a boy treble, tenor John Beard, and basses Henry Reinhold and William Savage. Baroque flute by Martin Wenner, after an original instrument by Carlos Palanca, Turin, 18th century.

Pachelbel Canon in D Major - the original and best version.

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02.09.2008

Pachelbel's Canon in D, performed on original instruments from the time of Pachelbel by the Early Music ensemble Voices of Music. Please subscribe to our channel 🤍 Is it really a canon? Yes, absolutely! The three violin parts are exactly the same. It's also a ground bass. Voices of Music FAQ Q. How can I support Voices of Music? A. Donate here: 🤍 and we will make more videos like this one :) These videos support working musicians, and the money comes from individual donors. Q. Where can I buy CDs? A. Our CDs are available on iTunes, Google, Amazon, CD Baby and just about everywhere; you can also buy a CD in a jewel case from Kunaki: 🤍 Soundtrack 🤍 Performed on original instruments by San Francisco Early Music Ensemble Voices of Music. Featuring Katherine Kyme, Carla Moore & Cynthia Freivogel, baroque violin; Tanya Tomkins, baroque cello, Hanneke van Proosdij, baroque organ; David Tayler, theorbo. About the performance: the canon is played using not only the instruments but also the bowing techniques from the time of Pachelbel. As you can see from the video, especially if you look at the high definition version, the string instruments are not only baroque, but they are in baroque setup: this means that the strings, fingerboard, bridge and other parts of the violin appear just as they did in Pachelbel's time. No metal hardware such as chinrests, clamps or fine tuners are used on the violins, allowing the violins to vibrate freely. A good example of baroque bowing can be seen in the extended passage of repeated notes: the musicians play these notes on one bow—the shorter & lighter baroque bow—to created a gliding effect. The players also hold the bow very differently which affects the balance and touch. Both the style and the amount of vibrato are based on baroque treatises which describe the methods for playing, bowing & articulation in the late 17th century. The narrow, shimmering vibrato blends with the baroque organ. The organ used is made entirely of wood, based on German baroque instruments, and the pipes are voiced to provide a smooth accompaniment to the strings, instead of a more soloistic sound. Another feature of the video is the subtle differences in not only the sound and color of the instruments, but also the different techniques of the players. All three are playing baroque violins with baroque bows, yet each person has her own distinct sound and bowing style—each bow has a different shape and balance. If you look at paintings of 17th century players you will see that they are all different, because that individuality of sound and technique was highly valued. This allows the players and the listeners to hear and appreciate the "Voices of Music." Many comments refer to the pitch. D Major is a key, not a pitch; this piece is in D Major at A=415.3 Hz. We chose a baroque pitch and temperament from the time of Pachelbel. You can see the original manuscript that we played from here, clearly in the key of D Major with two sharps 🤍 Detail of the interior of the baroque organ: 🤍 #Pachelbel #CanoninD Title: Canon in D Composer: Johann Pachelbel Genre: Classical

Arcangelo Corelli: Concerto in D Major Op. 6 No. 4, complete. Voices of Music; original instruments

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07.01.2015

The Concerto in D Major, Op. 6 No. 4, of Arcangelo Corelli, performed on original instruments by the Early Music ensemble Voices of Music. Adagio 0:00 Allegro 0:21 Adagio 3:29 Vivace 5:04 Allegro & Coda 6:08 Please subscribe to our channel 🤍 Voices of Music FAQ Q. How can I support Voices of Music? A. Donate here: 🤍 and we will make more videos like this one :) These videos cost thousands of dollars to make, and the money comes from individual donors. Q. Where can I learn more about this music? A. You can visit our website, 🤍 Also, subscribe to our video channel! Just click on the logo on our videos. Q. Where can we hear you play in concert? A. We perform in the San Francisco Bay Area. For a concert schedule, visit our website or join our mailing list 🤍 Q. Where can I buy CDs? A. Our CDs are available on iTunes, Google, Amazon, CD Baby and just about everywhere; you can also buy a CD in a jewel case from Kunaki: 🤍 Q. What is Early Music performance, or historical performance? A. We play on instruments from the time of the composers, and we use the original music and playing techniques: it’s a special sound. Q. Why are there no conductors? A. Conductors weren’t invented until the 19th century; since we seek to recreate a historical performance, the music is led from the keyboard or violin, or the music is played as chamber music~or both :) 300 years ago, Corelli's concertos, Op. 6, were published in 1714 in Amsterdam: these works dramatically affected the style of the baroque concerto for the next generation of composers. The reception of this magnificent collection, one of the crown jewels of baroque instrumental music, is in no small part due to the music publishing boom which began around 1690, as well as Corelli's signature set of violin sonatas, Opus 5, of which as Michael Talbot notes "at least 42 editions had appeared by 1800". The wide availability of Corelli's works created an international Corellian style. The concertos are written in an expanded trio sonata style, in which the two solo violins and cello form a small ensemble within the larger tutti framework. The fourth concerto is noteworthy for its suave and serene introduction, the gracefulness of the dance movement, the exceptionally well-balanced counterpoint and harmony, and the furious concluding coda which flows out of the second ending of the last movement. HD Video from the Voices of Music Lamentations of Jeremiah concert, April, 2014. In the year 1702, the Avvisi di Roma noted that for a performance during Holy Week of Scarlatti's Lamentations, the orchestra also played "a superb concerto for basses, violones, violins and violas of Arcangelo" (Griffin, The Late Baroque Serenata). For the 300th anniversary of Corelli's concertos, we will be releasing on video selections from Corelli's Opus 6 as well as Handel's Opus 6. Voices of Music David Tayler & Hanneke van Proosdij, directors Kati Kyme & Elizabeth Blumenstock solo baroque violins Shirley Edith Hunt, solo baroque cello Gabrielle Wunsch & Maxine Nemerovski ripieno baroque violins Lisa Grodin, baroque viola Farley Pearce, violone Hanneke van Proosdij, baroque organ David Tayler, archlute 🤍 #Corelli #ConcertoGrosso

Antonio Bertali: Ciaccona - Voices of Music; Alana Youssefian, baroque violin. 4K UHD video

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09.06.2019

Antonio Bertali's freewheeling variations on a ground bass. Performed on original instruments by the Early Music ensemble Voices of Music. 4K, ultra high definition video from our Musical Crossroads concert, January, 2019. Make a donation and we will make more videos like this one! 🤍 For this project, we carefully compared the the two original manuscript sources and made our own edition of the work. Voices of Music Hanneke van Proosdij and David Tayler, directors Alana Youssefian, baroque violin William Skeen, baroque cello Hanneke van Proosdij, harpsichord David Tayler, archlute Baroque violin by Jason Viseltear, 2016, after Carlo Giuseppe Testore, Milan, at the sign of the eagle. Italian single manual harpsichord by Johannes Klinkhamer, Amsterdam, 2000, after Cristofori, Florence, c1725 Baroque cello by Gianbattista Grancino, Milan, 1725 Archlute by Andreas von Holst, Munich, 2012, after Magno Tieffenbrucker, Venice, c1610

Lascia ch'io pianga (Händel's opera Rinaldo); Voices of Music with Kirsten Blaise, soprano

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26.04.2014

Please subscribe to our channel 🤍 Handel's signature aria from his Opera Rinaldo HWV 7 (1711), performed on original instruments by Voices of Music, with soprano Kirsten Blaise. Handel reworked one of his best arias from "Il trionfo del tempo" (1707) for Rinaldo, his first London opera, and the first Italian opera specifically composed for the London theatres. Buy CDs 🤍 Lascia ch'io pianga mia cruda sorte, e che sospiri la libertà. Il duolo infranga queste ritorte de' miei martiri sol per pietà. Let me weep over my cruel fate, and sigh for freedom. Let my sorrow break the chains of my suffering, out of pity. The Musicians (left to right, back to front) Kati Kyme, baroque violin Gabrielle Wunsch, baroque violin Elizabeth Blumenstock, baroque violin Maxine Nemerovski, baroque violin Lisa Grodin, baroque viola Farley Pearce, violone Shirley Edith Hunt, baroque cello David Tayler, archlute Hanneke van Proosdij, baroque organ And the fabulous Kirsten Blaise, soprano Voices of Music directed by Hanneke van Proosdij & David Tayler 🤍voicesofmusic.org #Handel #HandelAria #HandelOpera

Marco Uccellini: La Bergamasca; Voices of Music with Elizabeth Blumenstock & Alana Youssefian 4K UHD

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03.03.2020

Marco Uccellini's divisions on the Bergamasca ground. 4K, ultra high definition video from our Concerto delle Donne concert, October, 2019. Elizabeth Blumenstock & Alana Youssefian, baroque violins Elisabeth Reed, viola da gamba Hanneke van Proosdij, harpsichord David Tayler, baroque guitar

Torelli: Trumpet Concerto in D Major, complete (Roger 188). Voices of Music & Dominic Favia 4K UHD

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25.12.2020

Giuseppe Torelli's trumpet concerto in D Major, complete; Dominic Favia, baroque trumpet. For this performance, a new edition was prepared from the original print published by Estienne Roger in Amsterdam; Live, 4K ultra high definition video from our 2018 December concert in San Francisco. Please consider a donation and we will make more videos like this one! 🤍 Special thanks to Michael Talbot for his assistance with this project. 0:00 Allegro 1:59 Adagio 3:25 Presto 3:52 Adagio 4:30 Presto #Torelli

Vivaldi: Concerto in D Major RV 212 "St. Antonio," Alana Youssefian & Voices of Music, with cadenza!

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18.10.2018

The concluding Allegro from Vivaldi's Concerto in D Major for solo violin and strings, RV 212. Alana Youssefian, baroque violin, with the award winning Early Music Ensemble Voices of Music. Please subscribe to our channel 🤍 Live, 4K ultra high definition video from the main stage of the 2018 Berkeley Early Music Festival, performed on original instruments. This extraordinary work was composed circa 1712 and is one of only a handful of concertos that includes Vivaldi's original, high-voltage cadenzas. For this performance, Voices of Music prepared a new edition of the work from the original manuscripts: the dedication on the Pisandel ms. reads "fatto per la solennità della S. Lingua di St Antonio in Padua." This inscription most likely refers to the celebrations held at the basilica of St. Anthony (see Talbot, "The Vivaldi Compendium"). The range of the cadenza extends beyond the fingerboard of the violin, remarkable in 1712, and the concerto was singled out by Vivaldi's critics for its over-the-top virtuosity. A remarkable feature of the music is the call and response effects, borrowed from sacred music, which accompany the soloist. This work is here presented for the first time in 4K video. A native of New Jersey, Alana Youssefian has quickly forged a reputation as an engaging and spirited soloist, chamber player, and orchestral musician. Hailed for her “incredible poise,” “sensitive dynamics,” and “plangent emotional involvement” (The Boston Musical Intelligencer), Ms. Youssefian has performed internationally as a concertmaster and soloist, in addition to holding engagements at venues such as the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Carnegie Hall, and Alice Tully Hall. Ms. Youssefian is a graduate of The Juilliard School's Historical Performance Program, where she studied with Elizabeth Blumenstock, and Rachel Podger. Baroque violin by Jason Viseltear, 2016, after Carlo Giuseppe Testore, Milan, at the sign of the eagle. Every year, 20 million people watch Voices of Music videos worldwide. A donation will enable us to make more videos like this one! 🤍 Manuscript source: Sächsische Landesbibliothek, Dresden (D-Dl): Mus.2389-O-74. #Vivaldi #ClassicalMusicMatters

Handel: Tune your harps (Esther); Voices of Music, Thomas Cooley, tenor 4K

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The aria "Tune your harps" from Handel's oratorio Esther. Thomas Cooley, tenor; Marc Schachman, baroque oboe. Ultra high definition video from the Voices of Music "As steals the morn" concert, March, 2019. Please consider a donation, 🤍 .... and we will make more videos like this one :) In this aria, Handel skillfully creates a duet in which the singer has the main melody, and the oboe part has a dual role. The oboe alternates as a second singer, repeating or elaborating on the main melody using the rhythm of the text, and, at other times, providing an instrumental counterpoint, playing notes that would make no sense if sung, but which fit perfectly with the harmony. Handel seamlessly alternates from one style to the other to to create a deceptively simple but remarkably complex composition. The pizzicato accompaniment in the strings evokes the character of the harp which is the theme of the text as well as the symbol of the throne. Voices of Music Hanneke van Proosdij & David Tayler, directors Lisa Grodin, Toma Iliev, Carla Moore, Maxine Nemerovski, Linda Quan, Gabrielle Wunsch, baroque violin Adaiha MacAdam-Somer & Elisabeth Reed, baroque cello Farley Pearce, violone Hanneke van Proosdij, baroque organ David Tayler, archlute Text: Tune your harps to cheerful strains, Moulder idols into dust! Great Jehovah lives and reigns, We in great Jehovah trust. Tune your harps. . .

Heinrich Biber - Battalia à 10 (1673) Voices of Music 4K

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04.02.2020

The famous Battalia of Heinrich Biber, live 4K ultra high definition video.Presented here for the first time on period instruments in the 4K, ultra high definition format. Biber's work, dedicated to the god Bacchus, opens with a lively Sonata with a rich, harmonious texture for the strings. This is followed by a character piece with a strikingly dissonant pub atmosphere, where each musician plays a different pop song all at the same timelike listening to different radio channels all at once. A dance-y, foot-stomping presto brackets an unusual duet for violin and violone ("Mars"): the bass players are instructed to place sheets of paper over the strings for a snare drum effect. We used cloth paper as it is similar to the paper of Biber's time and it actually changed the sound. The music printed on the paper is from the E Minor Biber sonata we filmed with Elizabeth Blumenstock. Next, the title piece, a furious battle, here featuring two cellos firing broadsides (Bill turns the cello around to play left handed!). The work concludes with a lament for the wounded. 0:00 Sonata 1:45 The rowdy pub 2:35 Presto 3:18 Mars (the march) 4:37 Presto 5:39 Aria 7:50 Cello Battle 8:41 Lament for the wounded. Hic dissonat ubique nam ebrii sic diversis Cantilenis clamare solent! #Biber

Vivaldi: Concerto for two violins and two cellos in D Major RV 564 , 3rd mvt. Voices of Music, 8K

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05.10.2022

The jazzy concluding allegro from Vivaldi's Concerto in D Major for two violins and two cellos. Live, 8K video. Double the fun! Soloists: Kati Kyme, YuEun Kim, William Skeen & Elisabeth Reed. #vivaldi

Vivaldi Four Seasons: Summer (L'Estate), complete; Freivogel & Voices of Music, RV 315, original 4K

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02.11.2017

Vivaldi's Concerto for solo baroque violin and strings in G Minor, "Summer" (L'Estate, RV 315), performed on original instruments by Cynthia Miller Freivogel and the Early Music ensemble Voices of Music. 4K, ultra high definition video. Please subscribe to our channel 🤍 All Four Seasons now online! 🤍 Vivaldi printed Italian sonnets for each of the Four Seasons. The original Italian is available as well as an English translation in the video: just click the CC button to turn them on and off or select the language. Vivaldi's brilliant concerto is here presented complete in 4K, ultra high definition video, performed on original instruments. For this video, a new edition was prepared from the original sources, prints and manuscripts for Vivaldi's music. Voices of Music is creating a *worldwide digital library* of music videos, recordings and editions, free for anyone in the world. To support this vital project, which will enable new generations of people all around the world to enjoy Classical music, please consider a tax-deductible donation or sponsor a recording project. With your help, anything is possible! 🤍 Special thanks to Meg Bragle! Voices of Music continues our groundbreaking work as a pioneer in the new field of Ultra-High definition video. Although the Four Seasons is the most recorded work in Classical music, this is the first time that the work is made freely available in this format, and performed on period instruments. Your donations will keep the presses running! Voices of Music Hanneke van Proosdij & David Tayler, directors Cynthia Miller Freivogel, baroque violin by Johann Paul Schorn, Salzburg, Austria, 1715 Lisa Grodin, baroque viola by Mathias Eberl, Salzburg, Austria, 1680Katherine Heater, baroque organ by Winold van der Putten, Finsterwolde, Netherlands, 2004, after early 18th-century northern German instruments Kati Kyme, baroque violin by Johann Gottlob Pfretzschner, Mittenwald, 1791 Carla Moore, baroque violin by Johann Georg Thir, Vienna, Austria, 1754 Maxine Nemerovski, baroque violin by Joseph Gaffino, Paris, 1769 Farley Pearce, violone by George Stoppani, Manchester, 1985, after Amati, 1560 Hanneke van Proosdij, Italian single manual harpsichord by Johannes Klinkhamer, Amsterdam, 2000, after Cristofori, Florence, c1725 Elisabeth Reed, baroque cello, anonymous, 1673 William Skeen, five string baroque cello, Anonymous, Italy, c1680 David Tayler, archlute by Andreas von Holst, Munich, 2012 after Magno Tieffenbrucker, Venice, c1610 Gabrielle Wunsch, baroque violin by Lorenzo Carcassi, Florence, Italy, 1765 Produced by Meg Bragle ©2017 Voices of Music #Vivaldi #FourSeasons 0:00 Allegro non molto 5:22 Adagio 7:37 Presto

Handel: Ombra mai fu (Serse); Christopher Lowrey, countertenor, Voices of Music 4K UHD

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Countertenor Christopher Lowrey sings the aria Ombra mai fù, from Handel's opera *Serse.* 4K, Ultra HD video from the Voices of Music "Art of the Countertenor" concert, March, 2016. Please subscribe to our channel 🤍 Voices of Music FAQ Q. How can I support Voices of Music? A. Donate here: 🤍 and we will make more videos like this one :) These videos cost thousands of dollars to make, and the money comes from individual donors. Q. Where can I learn more about this music? A. You can visit our website, 🤍 Also, subscribe to our video channel! Just click on the logo on our videos. Q. Where can we hear you play in concert? A. We perform in the San Francisco Bay Area. For a concert schedule, visit our website or join our mailing list 🤍 Q. Where can I buy CDs? A. Our CDs are available on iTunes, Google, Amazon, CD Baby and just about everywhere; you can also buy a CD in a jewel case from Kunaki: 🤍 Q. What is Early Music performance, or historical performance? A. We play on instruments from the time of the composers, and we use the original music and playing techniques: it’s a special sound. Q. Why are there no conductors? A. Conductors weren’t invented until the 19th century; since we seek to recreate a historical performance, the music is led from the keyboard or violin, or the music is played as chamber music~or both :) Handel’s arias form one of the core repertories for singers of 18th-century music, owing not only to the quality of the compositions but also to the variety of affects and styles present in his operas, oratorios and sacred music. The aria “Ombra mai fù,” known also as “Handel’s Largo,” is one of his best-known works; somewhat surprisingly, it comes down to us through a circuitous path. The original version was composed by Cavalli in the mid-17th century, then “borrowed” by Bononcini for his 1694 production of the opera Serse, then substantially revised by Handel for his own version of Serse which premiered in London in April of 1738. Handel's version retains the overall texture, scoring and melodic shapes of the original, but Handel reworks the vocal line and creates more interplay between the singer and the violins. *Voices of Music is creating a worldwide digital library of music videos, recordings and editions, free for anyone in the world.* To support this vital project, which will enable new generations of people all around the world to enjoy Classical music, please consider a tax-deductible donation or sponsor a recording project. With your help, anything is possible! 🤍 Ombra mai fù di vegetabile, cara ed amabile, soave più. —Nicolò Minato Never was the shade from any plant more dear, more lovely, or so sweet. The Musicians and their Instruments Voices of Music performs on original instruments: hear the music played on instruments from the time of the composer. Lisa Grodin, baroque viola by Mathias Eberl, Salzburg, Austria, 1680 Kati Kyme, baroque violin by Johann Gottlob Pfretzschner, Mittenwald, 1791 Carla Moore, baroque violin by Johann Georg Thir, Vienna, Austria, 1754 Maxine Nemerovski, baroque violin by Joseph Gaffino, Paris, 1769 Elisabeth Reed, baroque cello, anonymous, 1673 Farley Pearce, violone by George Stoppani, Manchester, 1985, after Amati, 1560 David Tayler, archlute by Andreas von Holst, Munich, 2012, after Tieffenbrucker, c1610 Hanneke van Proosdij, baroque organ by Winold van der Putten, Finsterwolde, Netherlands, 2004, after early 18th-century northern German instruments Gabrielle Wunsch, baroque violin by Lorenzo Carcassi, Florence, Italy, 1765 #Handel #Countertenor

Handel: Tu del Ciel ministro eletto (Trionfo del Tempo); Amanda Forsythe & Voices of Music 4K

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The concluding aria, one of Handel’s finest compositions, from the oratorio "Trionfo del Tempo" HWV 46a, sung by Amanda Forsythe. Live, ultra high definition video from our concert "As Steals the Morn," 2019. Recit "Pure del Cielo" 0:00 Aria "Tu del Ciel" 1:21 This concert won the "Best of the Bay” award for Best Early Music Performance. Quite astonishingly, in the middle of a busy weekend in San Francisco, there were no sounds from the audience or from outside the church for the duration of this aria. Handel’s first oratorio is a masterpiece, premiered in the summer of 1707, to a libretto by Cardinal Benedetto Pamphili. The Oratorio is written in series of grand gestures, and in a variety of styles, from the highly florid to the deeply personal. The Aria “Tu del Ciel” ends the oratorio on a surprisingly still and numinous note, accompanied by a plangent countermelody on the solo violin. In the opening recitative, Belezza, the personification of Beauty, directly addresses the angels to hear her appeal for spiritual and intellectual illumination. This is a theme that Handel would return to in his setting of Milton’s “L’Allegro.” We have arranged the orchestra chords of the opening with a series of trills to capture the affect of the fluttering angels’ wings. This effect is described by the baroque music theorist and composer Johann Mattheson. Mattheson famously fought a duel with Handel in 1704 in the orchestra pit over who would direct the show from the harpsichord. According to legend, Handel was saved by one of his large, brass buttons. Handel’s accompaniment is a series of “perpetual motion” chords, invoking the inevitable wheel of time. He used a similar effect many years later in his oratorio Alexander Balus, in the aria “Convey me to some peaceful shore.” The invocation to the angels, so poignantly addressed in the recit, also honors the angel in the orchestra "Arcangelo" Corelli, who would have played the solo violin part in the aria. The soaring, arpeggiated soprano line graces the high A above the treble staff. The phrase “vano ardor”, vain passion, symbolizes the theme of Vanitas, the disintegration of all worldly things. Handel echoes the meaning of the text by fashioning a long, wandering phrase for the singer that slowly melts away into the final instrumental playout. Voices of Music Hanneke van Proosdij & David Tayler, directors Carla Moore, solo violin Tu del Ciel ministro eletto Belezza sings: Pure del Cielo intelligenze eterne, che vera scuola a ben amare aprite, udite, angeli, udite il pianto mio, e se la Verità dal Sole eterno tragge luce immortale, e a me lo scopre, fate che al gran desio rispondan l’opre. Tu del Ciel ministro eletto non vedrai più nel mio petto voglia infida, o vano ardor. E se vissi ingrata a Dio tu custode del cor mio a lui porta il nuovo cor. Tu del Ciel.... —Benedetto Pamphili Pure and eternal spirits of heaven who teach the art of true love hear me, angels, hear my cries, and as Truth from the ever-lasting Sun brings eternal light, so I may receive illumination, let my great desire be measured in my work. You, the chosen minister of Heaven, shall see no more in my heart a faithless wish or vain passion. And though I lived without thanks to God, may you, the guardian of my heart, bring to Him a new heart. You, the chosen minister.... ©2019 Voices of Music This is the quietest I have ever heard the audience in St Mark's. I imagine if I had looked outside, the cars, motorcycles, dogs, ambulances and skateboards would have all been frozen in place. #Handel

Schmelzer: Sonata Quarta; Elizabeth Blumenstock, baroque violin; Voices of Music

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Johann Schmelzer's Sonata Quarta in D Major from Sonatae Unarum Fidium (1664). Live video from the Voices of Music Great Artists Series in San Francisco. Featuring Elizabeth Blumenstock, baroque violin; William Skeen, viola da gamba; Hanneke van Proosdij, baroque organ, and David Tayler, theorbo. From the vault: a new render of this piece from the original digital master of 2012 to take advantage of YouTube's higher quality settings.

Vivaldi: Concerto in D Minor for two violins & cello RV 565, Voices of Music. Moore, Wong & Skeen.

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The Concerto in D Minor for two violins and violoncello, performed on original instruments by the award winning Early Music ensemble Voices of Music. Carla Moore, Rachell Ellen Wong and William Skeen, soloists. 4K ultra high definition video from the "Harmonic Labyrinth" concert, December, 2019. Voices of Music directed by Hanneke van Proosdij & David Tayler. This concerto, from Opus 3, was studied by Johann Sebastian Bach. A fleet stretto for the two solo violins opens the work, followed by a pointed Adagio which flows into an extended, angular fugue with extensive development, fragmentation and inversion of the subject and the stepwise countersubject. The fugue is followed by poignant slow movement for solo violin accompanied by the high strings, and brilliant, coda-like allegro closes out the concerto. The concerto highlights Vivaldi's mastery of complex counterpoint. The third violin: in the opening stretto, the pedal point is shared by the two soloists in alternation, creating the illusion of a third player. I. Allegro 0:00 II. Adagio e spiccato 0:43 III. Allegro 1:09 IV. Largo e spiccato 3:51 V. Allegro 6:09 Credits 9:03 #Vivaldi

Bach: Brandenburg Concerto No. 6 in B Flat Major BWV 1051, Voices of Music 4K UHD

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Brandenburg Concerto No. 6, live, UHD video from the Early Music Ensemble Voices of Music concert, December, 2017. Please consider a donation to support our musicians 🤍 In March of 1721, Johann Sebastian Bach meticulously inked six of his best concertos into a book for the Margrave of Brandenburg, Christian Ludwig. This original score is one of the great treasures of the 18th century. The original title, "Six Concerts à plusieurs instruments" is now known as the "Brandenburg" Concertos in English or "Brandenburgische Konzerte" in German. The sixth concerto features both the baroque viola and the viola da gamba (Concerto 6to à due Viole da Braccio, due Viole da Gamba, Violoncello, Violone e Cembalo). These concertos in style, quality, diversity and originality represent the summa of chamber music in the high baroque period. Brandenburg VI is at once the most innovative in terms of scoring and the more brilliant in terms of pure contrapuntal artistry of the set of six. Though not as popular as the lively 2nd and 3rd concertos, it is nonetheless an absolute masterpiece. The dazzling opening stretto, with the fugue subjects separated by the flick of a cat's paw, is followed by a lyrical slow movement that uses inversion of the theme to create both countersubject and episodes. Despite the ingenuity of the design, the counterpoint never intrudes on the steadily unfolding lyricism of the upper parts. The rollicking, relentless syncopation of the finale is leavened by a playful, conversational interchange between the viola parts. This video is part of the Voices of Music Great Works project. A Creative Commons edition of the score, based on the composer's manuscript, will be published to accompany the complete recording, and the recording will be available worldwide on Blu-Ray and CD, and for free on MP3 and high-definition, 24 bit FLAC files. Kati Kyme and Elizabeth Blumenstock, baroque viola (viole da braccio), Elisabeth Reed and William Skeen, viola da gamba Tanya Tomkins, baroque cello Farley Pearce, violone Hanneke van Proosdij, harpsichord Performed on original instruments from Bach's autograph score. 0:00 (Allegro) 6:00 Adagio ma non tanto 10:25 Allegro #Bach

Vivaldi: Violin Concerto in D Major (Grosso Mogul), Augusta McKay Lodge, Voices of Music RV 208 8K

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30.11.2022

A special collaboration with Gotham Early Music Scene (GEMS) and Voices of Music: Vivaldi's "Emperor" Concerto in D Major, performed on original instruments. Augusta McKay Lodge, baroque violin. The opening Allegro combines grand scales with trumpet like flourishes, and includes one of the original cadenzas from the time of Vivaldi. This concerto is one of the ones Bach selected to transcribe for organ as BWV 594. Live, 8K video from our concert in NYC, October 6, 2022. GEMS is a non-profit corporation that supports and promotes the artists and organizations in New York devoted to Early Music— the music of the Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, and early Classical periods. Visit them on the web at 🤍 Voices of Music is filming in 8K! To support our work, visit us at 🤍 Voices of Music Hanneke van Proosdij & David Tayler, directors Aniela Eddy, Kati Kyme, Isabelle Seula Lee, Augusta McKay Lodge and Shelby Yamin, baroque violin Kyle Miller and Maureen Murchie, baroque viola Ana Kim and William Skeen, baroque cello Doug Balliett, baroque bass Dongsok Shin, baroque organ Hanneke van Proosdij, harpsichord David Tayler, archlute Live from Saint Ignatius of Antioch Episcopal Church, Manhattan. Producer: John Thiessen Video director: Murat Eyuboglu Audio Engineer: David Tayler Harpsichord by John Phillips Filmed in 8K with Sony A1 cameras and lenses. Microphones by Sennheiser and Schoeps. #vivaldi

Vivaldi Four Seasons: Spring (La Primavera) Full, original. Youssefian & Voices of Music RV 269 4K

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The complete concerto, "La Primavera" (Spring), from the Four Seasons. Voices of Music, Alana Youssefian, baroque violin. The concerto is here presented in 4K, ultra high definition video, performed on original instruments from the time of Vivaldi. Please subscribe to our channel 🤍 All Four Seasons now online! 🤍 For this video, a new edition was prepared from the original sources, prints and manuscripts for Vivaldi's music. In preparing this performing edition, we made the musicological decision that the indication for mutes in the Allegro ("con Sordine") for the violins is misplaced in the original print (there is no indication in the Manchester part books), and the mutes should be in the Largo (and, importantly, not in the final movement). The mutes now provide a textural fence between the violas and the soloist. Vivaldi writes that the last movement is a rustic dance to the sound of bagpipes (“Zampogna”). So we also listened to some old style Italian bagpipes and added a few notes to the drones in Vivaldi's bass part to recreate this brilliant and special sound. Here is our new version, with the muted violins in the slow movement, and the vibrant, un-muted final allegro. Ms Youssefian plays a baroque violin by Jason Viseltear, 2016, after Carlo Giuseppe Testore, Milan, at the sign of the eagle. Special thanks to Michael Talbot. NB: Subtitles are by Antonio Vivaldi! Buy CDs 🤍 Visit us on the web at 🤍 Ms Youssefian is represented by Schwalbe and Partners 🤍 #Vivaldi #Spring #FourSeasons 0:00 I: Allegro 3:37 II: Largo 6:24 III: Allegro

Marco Uccellini: La Bergamasca Voices of Music

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06.11.2008

Hey everyone~! Please consider a donation, 🤍 and we will make more videos like this one :) Marco Uccellini's divisions on the Bergamasca ground: Live, HD video from the San Francisco Early Music Ensemble Voices of Music Capriccio Stravagante Concert, November 2008. Voices of Music FAQ Q. How can I support Voices of Music? A. Donate here: 🤍 and we will make more videos like this one :) These videos cost thousands of dollars to make, and the money comes from individual donors. Q. Where can I learn more about this music? A. You can visit our website, 🤍 Also, subscribe to our video channel! Just click on the logo on our videos. Q. Where can we hear you play in concert? A. We perform in the San Francisco Bay Area. For a concert schedule, visit our website or join our mailing list 🤍 Q. Where can I buy CDs? Our CDs are available on iTunes, Google, Amazon, CD Baby and just about everywhere; you can also buy a CD in a jewel case from Kunaki: 🤍 Q. What is Early Music performance, or historical performance? A. We play on instruments from the time of the composers, and we use the original music and playing techniques: it’s a special sound. Q. Why are there no conductors? A. Conductors weren’t invented until the 19th century; since we seek to recreate a historical performance, the music is led from the keyboard or violin, or the music is played as chamber music~or both  Q. What are period instruments or original instruments; how are they different from modern instruments? A. As instruments became modernized in the 19th century, builders and players tended to focus on the volume of sound and the stability of tuning. Modern steel strings replaced the older materials, and instruments were often machine made. Historical instruments, built individually by hand and with overall lighter construction, have extremely complex overtones—which we find delightful. Modern instruments are of course perfectly suited to more modern music. Q. Why is the pitch lower, or higher? A. Early Music performance uses many different pitches, and these pitches create different tone colors on the instruments. See 🤍 🤍voicesofmusic.org #Uccellini #Bergamasca

Pergolesi: Stabat Mater (complete performance); Voices of Music, original version, Labelle & Bragle

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25.03.2012

The Stabat Mater of Giovanni Battista Pergolesi. Live, high-definition video of the entire work in concert by the San Francisco Early Music Ensemble Voices of Music. Soloists: Dominique Labelle, soprano; Meg Bragle, mezzo-soprano. In his short life, Giovanni Pergolesi composed a wide variety of music in the major genres of the time. His primary compositions were also operas, especially the new Opera Buffa (comic opera). His highly influential mini-opera, La Serva Padrona (1733) was the subject of a fierce debate in France over the future of opera, and was one of the most popular operas of the mid-18th century. The Stabat Mater, written in 1736, may have been composed for members of the secular nobility, the Cavalieri della Vergine dei Dolori, that met in Naples and commissioned a setting of the Stabat Mater every year. A few years earlier, Alessandro Scarlatti set the same text for members of the same group. Pergolesi's Stabat Mater was an immediate hit, and was copied, imitated, arranged and reprinted many times throughout Europe. When it was engraved in London in 1749, it quickly became the most frequently printed musical work in the 18th century. Deconstructing Pergolesi Despite the widespread modern appreciation of the Stabat Mater, many questions remain about how the work was intended to be performed, and much of the preparation for this concert involved the making of a new edition, in which the many extraneous dynamics and articulation markings were removed, and Pergolesi's own unusual instructions, such as "sotto voce", "lasciare", and "dolce assai" were restored. Contemporaneous copies of the holograph manuscript as well as other works in the six surviving Pergolesi manuscripts were consulted for clues as to the interpretation of Pergolesi's markings: early copies of the original Stabat Mater manuscript, which differ only in small details, provided a number of missing or illegible notes. A dozen or so bars from the viola part, missing for hundreds of years, have also been restored. The musicians of Voices of Music all contributed valuable insights for the final version. Pergolesi does not specify a specific voice type in his manuscript; however, the wide dynamic range and difficult sequences of trills indicate singers experienced in baroque opera, which fits with the secular provenance of the commission. Virtuoso music from this time was sung by both men and women, and although Farinelli and Senesino were operatic superstars (and a box-office guarantee), the soprano Margherita Durastanti was known to have sung operas by Scarlatti in Naples, and Francesca Cuzzoni sang all over Italy. We have chosen to interpret many of the original dynamic markings as transitional, so that instead of playing sections that simply alternate between loud and soft, there are gradations of phrasing between the pairs of dynamic marks. Once the accretions of centuries of performances have been removed, Pergolesi's score is surprisingly modern and streamlined in style: bold harmonies and vibrant rhythmic patterns occur in every movement, yet each individual section has its own special character. The fugal ending is a slight but meaningful nod towards the more traditional ending of a large-scale liturgical work; even here, in the sacrosanct Amen, Pergolesi cannot resist giving the fugal structure a splash of chromatic paint as the piece moves inexorably to the final cadence. 0:00 Stabat Mater Dolorosa 4:04 Cujus animam gementem 6:23 O quam tristis et afflicta 8:47 Quae moerebat et dolebat 10:52 Quis est homo 10:52 Vidit suum dulcem natum 17:38 Eja mater fons amoris 20:04 Fac ut ardeat cor meum 22:44 Sancta mater, istud agas 28:04 Fac ut portem Christi mortem 32:01 Inflammatus et accensus 34:16 Quando corpus morietur 38:04 Amen #Pergolesi #StabatMater

Alessandro Grandi: Venetian Christmas Vespers, complete. Voices of Music

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The Christmas Vespers of Alessandro Grandi (Venice, 1630): live, high-definition video from our December 2013 concert in San Francisco. Voices of Music Hanneke van Proosdij & David Tayler, directors There is a complete companion lecture for this concert: 🤍 Laura Heimes, soprano Jennifer Ellis Kampani, soprano John Taylor Ward, baritone Elizabeth Blumenstock, baroque violin Carla Moore, baroque violin Lisa Grodin, baroque violin & viola William Skeen, viola da gamba & baroque cello David Tayler, archlute & theorbo Hanneke van Proosdij, baroque organ, harpsichord & recorder Our program is a reconstruction of a Vespers service for First Vespers on Christmas Eve. A Vespers service differs radically from the Eucharistic service of the Mass. It originated in the monastic Office Hours, recited every three hours around the clock. Vespers is the early evening service, but in actuality comprises two services: First Vespers on the vigil, or evening before the feast, and Second Vespers on the late afternoon of the feast itself. Like most of the Office Hours, the central part of the service is the recitation of Old Testament psalms. In a Vespers service there are five psalms, chosen according to the particular feast, such as Christmas, or the type of feast, such as Sundays, or feasts of the Virgin, feasts of Holy Martyrs, etc. For some feasts, such as Christmas, the series of psalms and some other texts is a bit different for First Vespers than it is for Second Vespers. All Vespers services close (except for short parting prayers) with another psalm-like text, the Magnificat, from the Gospel according to Luke in which the Virgin Mary sings to her cousin Elizabeth of her joy at the news she is carrying the Christ child. Thus, the central part of the program tonight is the set of five psalms from the Latin Vulgate designated by the Church as those for Christmas Eve, Dixit Dominus, Confitebor tibi, Beatus vir, Laudate pueri and Laudate Dominum plus the concluding Magnificat. But as you look at the order of pieces on tonight’s program, you will see that there are other compositions beyond the five psalms and Magnificat. The two that are integral to every Vespers service are, after the instrumental introduction, Deus in adiutorium, the Gregorian chant versicle and response that open every Vespers service, and a strophic hymn, prior to the Magnificat. In the program you will see an indication for the Christmas hymn, Jesu Redemptor omnium substituted by an organ hymn by Girolamo Frescobaldi, organist at St. Peter’s in Rome. In an actual Vespers service, the celebrant would have spoken the hymn text under his breath while the organist was playing. The substitution of an instrumental piece for the hymn leads us to the final aspect of tonight’s Vespers service. From early in the history of the Catholic Church and its liturgy, the singing of each psalm and the Magnificat was accompanied by the singing of a shorter text, called an antiphon, at least before and after the psalm, and sometimes between verses as well. Even more than the psalms, antiphon texts were specific to the particular feast or type of feast. So even though the psalms for Christmas Eve are the same as the psalms for Sundays and male feasts, the antiphons for each psalm were unique to Christmas Eve only. By the 16th century we encounter the practice of substituting for the antiphons assigned to a particular feast some other text in a polyphonic musical setting or even an instrumental composition. Where an instrumental piece was substituted for an antiphon, the celebrant would have recited the appropriate text sotto voce as mentioned above with regard to the substitution of Frescobaldi’s organ piece for the Christmas hymn. For tonight’s program, Voices of Music has substituted a series of vocal motets and instrumental compositions by some of the most prominent composers of the period, including Grandi’s own maestro at St. Mark’s, Claudio Monteverdi, in place of the antiphons after each psalm and the Magnificat. While the Magnificat and its antiphon were the final major liturgical elements in a Vespers service, the service itself closed with a group prayer, called a collect, and a brief dismissal from the priest. We know that additional music was sometimes performed during these functions, especially for major feasts with elaborate music. Tonight we’ll hear a motet by Grandi for the collect, and this recreation of a Christmas service closes with the joyous Cantate Domino, “Sing to the Lord,” of Monteverdi. Of all Monteverdi’s surviving music, Cantate Domino is the closest to the style of Grandi, so it makes an ideal composition by the greatest composer of the 17th century to close a performance dedicated to the music of his one-time vice maestro di cappella, Alessandro Grandi. notes by Jeffrey Kurtzman

Vivaldi: Violin Concerto in A Minor RV 356 Op. 3 No 6, full. Augusta McKay Lodge, Voices of Music 8K

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15.08.2022

Please subscribe to our channel 🤍 This work is presented for the first time in 8K video. In addition to our standard microphone array, the audio was recorded in parallel with an 8 channel, 2nd order ambisonics microphone from Core Audio. The video was filmed using Sony A1 cameras. The concerto was published in Amsterdam in 1711 as part of L'Estro Armonico (literally, "furious harmony"). Michael Talbot described Opus 3 as "perhaps the most influential collection of instrumental music to appear during the whole of the eighteenth century," and although that honor is usually reserved for Corelli's Opus 6, Vivaldi's collection influenced generations of composers, including J.S. Bach. Voices of Music Hanneke van Proosdij & David Tayler , directors #Vivaldi #8K #ambisonics One of Vivaldi's best known concertos, the work has been covered by many soloists and is very well known to students, as it appears in Suzuki Violin Book 4. 0:00 I. Allegro 2:43 II. Largo 4:54 III. Presto P.S. If you are learning this piece it is good to practice it slow!

Handel: Sento Brillar (Il Pastor Fido); Christopher Lowrey, countertenor, Voices of Music 4K

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24.07.2016

Hi everyone~! Please consider a donation 🤍 and we will make more videos like this one :) The scintillating aria "Sento Brillar," from Handel's "Il Pastor Fido," Christopher Lowrey, countertenor. Live, 4K ultra HD video from the Voices of Music "Art of the Countertenor" concert, March, 2016. Voices of Music FAQ Q. How can I support Voices of Music? A. Donate here: 🤍 and we will make more videos like this one :) These videos cost thousands of dollars to make, and the money comes from individual donors. Q. Where can I learn more about this music? A. You can visit our website, 🤍 Also, subscribe to our video channel! Just click on the logo on our videos. Q. Where can we hear you play in concert? A. We perform in the San Francisco Bay Area. For a concert schedule, visit our website or join our mailing list 🤍 Q. Where can I buy CDs? A. Our CDs are available on iTunes, Google, Amazon, CD Baby and just about everywhere; you can also buy a CD in a jewel case from Kunaki: 🤍 Q. What is Early Music performance, or historical performance? A. We play on instruments from the time of the composers, and we use the original music and playing techniques: it’s a special sound. Q. Why are there no conductors? A. Conductors weren’t invented until the 19th century; since we seek to recreate a historical performance, the music is led from the keyboard or violin, or the music is played as chamber music~or both :) Q. What are period instruments or original instruments; how are they different from modern instruments? A. As instruments became modernized in the 19th century, builders and players tended to focus on the volume of sound and the stability of tuning. Modern steel strings replaced the older materials, and instruments were often machine made. Historical instruments, built individually by hand and with overall lighter construction, have extremely complex overtones—which we find delightful. Modern instruments are of course perfectly suited to more modern music. Q. Why is the pitch lower, or higher? A. Early Music performance uses many different pitches, and these pitches create different tone colors on the instruments. See 🤍 A virtuoso opera singer in the time of Handel would have exploited the form of the Da Capo aria to the fullest extent possible by adding brilliant and original ornaments to the repeat of the first "A" section. When paired with the imagination of the best singers in Europe, the Da Capo aria proved to be one of the most popular and enduring forms of the baroque. This important composition of Handel is now available for the first time in 4K, ultra-high definition video. *Voices of Music is creating a worldwide digital library of music videos and recordings, free for anyone in the world.* To support this vital project, which will enable new generations of people all around the world to enjoy Classical music, please consider a tax-deductible donation or sponsor a recording project. With your help, anything is possible! 🤍 Special thanks to Peter Jones for help with the musical score! Sento brillar nel sen Sento brillar nel sen un novo lieto ardor, che mi consola. Ah! che la sola speme del caro amato bene al duol m’invola —Giacomo Rossi, based on Giovanni Guarini I feel a glimmer in my breast A new happy burning That consoles me Ah! May the hope alone, merely the hope, of my dear well-beloved take me away from grief. —Translation by Cynthia Craig Simon The Musicians and their Instruments Voices of Music performs on original instruments: hear the music played on instruments from the time of the composer. Lisa Grodin, baroque viola by Mathias Eberl, Salzburg, Austria, 1680 Kati Kyme, baroque violin by Johann Gottlob Pfretzschner, Mittenwald, 1791 Carla Moore, baroque violin by Johann Georg Thir, Vienna, Austria, 1754 Maxine Nemerovski, baroque violin by Joseph Gaffino, Paris, 1769 Elisabeth Reed, baroque cello, anonymous, 1673 Farley Pearce, violone by George Stoppani, Manchester, 1985, after Amati, 1560 David Tayler, archlute by Andreas von Holst, Munich, 2012, after Tieffenbrucker, c1610 Hanneke van Proosdij, Italian single manual harpsichord by Johannes Klinkhamer, Amsterdam, 2000, after Cristofori, Florence, c1725 Gabrielle Wunsch, baroque violin by Lorenzo Carcassi, Florence, Italy, 1765

Vivaldi: Violin Concerto in D Major (Grosso Mogul) Grave Recitativo, Augusta McKay Lodge, RV 208 8K

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A special collaboration with Gotham Early Music Scene (GEMS) and Voices of Music: Vivaldi's "Emperor" Concerto in D Major, performed on original instruments. Augusta McKay Lodge, baroque violin. The rhapsodic slow movement, with carefully written-out ornaments spun over a sparse accompaniment, highlights the extraordinary breadth of Vivaldi's compositional abilities. Live, 8K video from our concert in NYC, October 6, 2022. GEMS is a non-profit corporation that supports and promotes the artists and organizations in New York devoted to Early Music— the music of the Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, and early Classical periods. Visit them on the web at 🤍 Voices of Music is filming in 8K! To support our work, visit us at 🤍 Voices of Music Hanneke van Proosdij & David Tayler, directors Augusta McKay Lodge, baroque violin Dongsok Shin, baroque organ William Skeen, baroque cello Live from Saint Ignatius of Antioch Episcopal Church, Manhattan. Producer: John Thiessen Video director: Murat Eyuboglu Audio Engineer: David Tayler #vivaldi #mogul

Johann Heinrich Schmelzer: Sonata Quarta; Elizabeth Blumenstock, baroque violin; Voices of Music

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Hey everyone~! Please consider a donation, 🤍 and we will make more videos like this one :) Johann Schmelzer's Sonata Quarta in D Major from Sonatae Unarum Fidium (1664). Live video from the Voices of Music Great Artists Series in San Francisco. Featuring Elizabeth Blumenstock, baroque violin; William Skeen, viola da gamba; Hanneke van Proosdij, baroque organ, and David Tayler, theorbo. Voices of Music FAQ Q. How can I support Voices of Music? A. Donate here: 🤍 and we will make more videos like this one :) These videos cost thousands of dollars to make, and the money comes from individual donors. Q. Where can I learn more about this music? A. You can visit our website, 🤍 Also, subscribe to our video channel! Just click on the logo on our videos. Q. Where can we hear you play in concert? A. We perform in the San Francisco Bay Area. For a concert schedule, visit our website or join our mailing list 🤍 Q. Where can I buy CDs? Our CDs are available on iTunes, Google, Amazon, CD Baby and just about everywhere; you can also buy a CD in a jewel case from Kunaki: 🤍 Q. What is Early Music performance, or historical performance? A. We play on instruments from the time of the composers, and we use the original music and playing techniques: it’s a special sound. Q. Why are there no conductors? A. Conductors weren’t invented until the 19th century; since we seek to recreate a historical performance, the music is led from the keyboard or violin, or the music is played as chamber music~or both  Q. What are period instruments or original instruments; how are they different from modern instruments? A. As instruments became modernized in the 19th century, builders and players tended to focus on the volume of sound and the stability of tuning. Modern steel strings replaced the older materials, and instruments were often machine made. Historical instruments, built individually by hand and with overall lighter construction, have extremely complex overtones—which we find delightful. Modern instruments are of course perfectly suited to more modern music. Q. Why is the pitch lower, or higher? A. Early Music performance uses many different pitches, and these pitches create different tone colors on the instruments. See 🤍 One of the finest examples of the early baroque German sonatas for violin and continuo, the Sonata Quarta of Johann Schmelzer combines florid passagework with harmonic and contrapuntal ingenuity. A ground bass connects each of the varied movements, and the work concludes with a virtuosic cadenza over a pedal point. Considered one of the finest violinists in world in 1660, Schmelzer published a collection of his solo sonatas of 1664; these are some of the most important works for the violin in the 17th century. The sonatas are Italianate in style, and set the stage for subsequent works of Biber and Bach. #Schmelzer #Sonata

Michael Praetorius: Es ist ein Ros entsprungen, Voices of Music 4K UHD video

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An instrumental version of Es ist ein Ros entsprungen, performed by Voices of Music. Live, 4K UHD video from the Virtuoso Concerto concert, December 17, 2016. Michael Praetorius was one of the most important composers and theorists of the late renaissance and early-17th century. His astonishing encyclopedia of music gives us an intriguing glimpse into the instruments and performance practices of the time, and his writing covers all aspects of music. Praetorius wrote popular hymn settings, as well as large-scale compositions that borrowed elements of the Italian polychoral tradition. Praetorius was a tune collector, just like the musicologists of the late 19th and early 20th centuries who collected songs and dances from different countries; he planned eight volumes of these secular works, but he only finished one: his book of French instrumental dances Terpsichore, named after the muse of dance (1612). Es ist ein Ros entsprungen is Praetorius’s setting of a preexisting tune which appears in 1609 in the Speyer hymnal. The text paraphrases the themes in Isaiah 11:1, “A shoot will grow from the root of Jesse, and the branch from the roots will bear fruit.” In the early 17th century, it was common practice to adapt vocal music for all kinds of instrumental performance. Here we have adapted the music to the pavan rhythm that was popular c1600-1615: ♩ ♫ ♩ ♫ ♩ ♫ Voices of Music Hanneke van Proosdij and David Tayler Directors Musicians (left to right) Carla Moore, Gabrielle Wunsch, Lisa Grodin and Maxine Nemerovski, baroque violins Maria Caswell, baroque viola Peter Maund, frame drum Elisabeth Reed and Tanya Tomkins, baroque cellos Farley Pearce, violone David Tayler, archlute Hanneke van Proosdij, baroque organ

Bach: Sonata from Cantata 182, "Himmelskönig, sei willkommen;" Rachel Podger & Voices of Music

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The opening sonata from Bach's Cantata "Himmelskönig, sei willkommen" BWV182a beautiful work for solo violin and recorder with string accompaniment. Rachel Podger & Hanneke van Proosdij, soloists; live, 4K UHD video from our concert at the Berkeley Early Music Festival, June, 2016. Voices of Music FAQ Q. How can I support Voices of Music? A. Donate here: 🤍 and we will make more videos like this one :) These videos cost thousands of dollars to make, and the money comes from individual donors. Q. Where can I learn more about this music? A. You can visit our website, 🤍 Also, subscribe to our video channel! Just click on the logo on our videos. Q. Where can we hear you play in concert? A. We perform in the San Francisco Bay Area. For a concert schedule, visit our website or join our mailing list 🤍 Q. Where can I buy CDs? A. Our CDs are available on iTunes, Google, Amazon, CD Baby and just about everywhere; you can also buy a CD in a jewel case from Kunaki: 🤍 Q. What is Early Music performance, or historical performance? A. We play on instruments from the time of the composers, and we use the original music and playing techniques: it’s a special sound. Q. Why are there no conductors? A. Conductors weren’t invented until the 19th century; since we seek to recreate a historical performance, the music is led from the keyboard or violin, or the music is played as chamber music~or both :) Q. What are period instruments or original instruments; how are they different from modern instruments? A. As instruments became modernized in the 19th century, builders and players tended to focus on the volume of sound and the stability of tuning. Modern steel strings replaced the older materials, and instruments were often machine made. Historical instruments, built individually by hand and with overall lighter construction, have extremely complex overtones—which we find delightful. Modern instruments are of course perfectly suited to more modern music. Q. Why is the pitch lower, or higher? A. Early Music performance uses many different pitches, and these pitches create different tone colors on the instruments. See 🤍 Every two years, the San Francisco Early Music Society presents some of the finest ensembles in the world at the Berkeley Early Music Festival; we hope you enjoy this work from the "Art of the Baroque Violin" concert with Rachel Podger. Voices of Music Hanneke van Proosdij & David Tayler, directors Rachel Podger, Carla Moore, Kati Kyme & Elizabeth Blumenstock (center, left to right), baroque violins Hanneke van Proosdij, recorder Lisa Grodin, baroque viola William Skeen, baroque cello Farley Pearce, violone Katherine Heater, baroque organ David Tayler, archlute Special thanks to the San Francisco Early Music Society and BFX 2016 for presenting these concerts. Visit SFEMS on the web at 🤍

Torelli: Trumpet Concerto in D Major "Estienne Roger 188" Voices of Music with Dominic Favia 4K

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The opening allegro from Giuseppe Torelli's concerto for trumpet and strings in D Major, performed from a new edition of the original print published by Estienne Roger in Amsterdam; Dominic Favia, baroque trumpet. Live, 4K ultra high definition video from our 2018 December concert in San Francisco. Please consider a donation and we will make more videos like this one! 🤍 Special thanks to Michael Talbot for his assistance with this project.

Henry Purcell: Rondeau from Abdelazer (Z570), Voices of Music; performed on original instruments 4K

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Please subscribe to our channel 🤍 The Rondeau from the incidental music (Z570) that Henry Purcell composed for the play Abdelazer, or the Moor's Revenge. HD Video from the Voices of Music Brandenburg Concerto project, 2013. One of Purcell’s last works, the Abdelazer was staged in 1695, the year of Purcell's death, and the text of the play was written Aphra Behn. The Rondeau’s place in history was assured when the composer Benjamin Britten chose it for his Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra: Variations and Fugue on a Theme of Purcell (1946). After Purcell's death, his wife Frances gathered much of his unpublished works, and these were printed as “A collection of ayres, compos'd for the theatre and upon other occasions.” Buy CDs 🤍 #Purcell #Rondeau

Bach: Brandenburg Concerto No. 4 in G Major BWV 1049, original with echo flutes; Voices of Music 4K

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Brandenburg Concerto No. 4, performed on original instruments including the rarely heard "echo flutes". 4K, UHD video from the award winning ensemble Voices of Music. Carla Moore, baroque violin solo; Hanneke van Proosdij & Andrew Levy, recorders & echo flutes. Performance and 4K UHD Video by the Early Music ensemble Voices of Music. In March of 1721, Johann Sebastian Bach carefully inked six of his best concertos into a book for the Margrave of Brandenburg, Christian Ludwig. The original title, "Six Concerts à plusieurs instruments" is now known as the "Brandenburg" Concertos in English or "Brandenburgische Konzerte" in German. These six concertos represent the summa of chamber music in the high baroque period: for the fourth concerto (BWV 1049), Bach chose the unique and imaginative texture of baroque violin and “echo flutes” (a type of baroque recorder) for his soloists. In his autograph manuscript of Brandenburg 4 (BWV 1049), Bach writes the title as follows: "Concerto 4to à Violino Principale, due Fiauti d'Echo, due Violini, una Viola è Violone in Ripieno, Violoncello è Continuo." For our video, we use the “echo flutes” for the slow movement, then break them apart for the first and third movements. The outside movements feature exceptionally virtuosic writing for the violin, with extended passagework spanning the entire range of the instrument. For his fourth concerto in the set of Brandenburgs, Bach is especially careful with the orchestration: this creates space for the recorder sound to breathe; in addition, his compositional style flows with sparkle and wit. The fourth Brandenburg concerto is unusual in that Bach specifically calls for "echo flutes", or "fiauti d'echo". For many years musicologists have debated what an "echo flute" exactly is, and have also uncovered a great deal of historical detail, but the work is usually performed with two alto recorders. YouTube now has a limit on the length of the description text; more information about the echo flutes and this recording here: 🤍 #Bach #BrandenburgConcerto #EchoFlute 0:00 Allegro 6:47 Andante (with echo flutes) 16:15 Presto

Diego Ortiz: Recercada segunda; Elisabeth Reed & The Voice of the Viol 4K UHD

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The Recercada Segunda of Diego Ortiz, performed by the viol consort The Voice of the Viol; Elisabeth Reed, viola da gamba solo. Voices of Music FAQ Q. How can I support Voices of Music? A. Donate here: 🤍 and we will make more videos like this one :) These videos cost thousands of dollars to make, and the money comes from individual donors. Q. Where can I learn more about this music? A. You can visit our website, 🤍 Also, subscribe to our video channel! Just click on the logo on our videos. Q. Where can we hear you play in concert? A. We perform in the San Francisco Bay Area. For a concert schedule, visit our website or join our mailing list 🤍 Q. Where can I buy CDs? A. Our CDs are available on iTunes, Google, Amazon, CD Baby and just about everywhere; you can also buy a CD in a jewel case from Kunaki: 🤍 Q. What is Early Music performance, or historical performance? A. We play on instruments from the time of the composers, and we use the original music and playing techniques: it’s a special sound. Q. Why are there no conductors? A. Conductors weren’t invented until the 19th century; since we seek to recreate a historical performance, the music is led from the keyboard or violin, or the music is played as chamber music~or both :) Q. What are period instruments or original instruments; how are they different from modern instruments? A. As instruments became modernized in the 19th century, builders and players tended to focus on the volume of sound and the stability of tuning. Modern steel strings replaced the older materials, and instruments were often machine made. Historical instruments, built individually by hand and with overall lighter construction, have extremely complex overtones—which we find delightful. Modern instruments are of course perfectly suited to more modern music. Q. Why is the pitch lower, or higher? A. Early Music performance uses many different pitches, and these pitches create different tone colors on the instruments. See 🤍 This recercada was printed in Rome in 1553 as part of Ortiz's treatise on ornamentation. In this composition, Ortiz demonstrates how to create a highly imaginative set of variations over a repeating bass pattern called the "passamezzo moderno." Live video from the inaugural concert, Friday October 7, 2016; this work is presented here for the first time in 4K, UHD video. To help support more viola da gamba videos, please consider a donation :) 🤍 The Voice of the Viol was founded in 2015 in order to perform and film consort and solo music for the viola da gamba. Directed by Adaiha MacAdam-Somer, the Voice of the Viol is part of the Early Music ensemble Voices of Music. Voices of Music now has 40 videos featuring the viola da gamba, you can view the entire playlist here: 🤍 As always, our music is free for anyone in the world to view. The Voice of the Viol, Adaiha MacAdam-Somer, director Elisabeth Reed, bass viol solo Joanna Blendulf, treble viol Adaiha MacAdam-Somer, tenor viol Farley Pearce, bass viol David Tayler, renaissance lute Special thanks to Peter Winkelstein, Toby & Marie Szuts.

Marin Marais: Le Labyrinthe (the Labyrinth); Cassandra Luckhardt, viola da gamba

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Hi everyone~! Please consider a donation so we can keep making viola da gamba videos 🤍 Marin Marais: Le Labyrinthe (the Labyrinth), from Book IV, published in Paris, 1717. Cassandra Luckhardt, viola da gamba, with Elisabeth Reed, viola da gamba, and Katherine Heater, harpsichord. In the first half of the 18th century, the French player-composers dazzled audiences with their varied and beautifully crafted compositions as well as their technical abilities. In 1717, Marin Marais published his fourth book: a monumental and diverse collection of music for the viola da gamba. One of best known of the suites in this book is the “Suite d'un Goût Etranger” (Suite in an unusual style) which contains a dizzying array of character pieces, reminiscent of a “cabinet of curiosities” in literature and art, such as the Cabinet Bonnier de la Mosson, hidden within the architectural maze of the Jardin des Plantes in Paris. The centerpiece of this “curious” suite is a daring and virtuosic composition entitled “The Labyrinth.” Labyrinths were well-known throughout Europe since the middle ages, and between 1672 and 1677, Louis XIV commissioned a spectacular labyrinth at Versailles, consisting of 39 stations based on Aesop's fables, and 333 sculptures, accompanied by a beautifully engraved guide book (source: the 1679 edition of Perrault's Labyrinte de Versailles, and Wikipedia). As each station was based on a particular story, the Labyrinth by design incorporated a narrative program. Marias was a pioneer in "program music," and for his musical maze, Marais creates a brilliant and evocative set of programmatic scenes, and although the program is not accompanied by a description, as in his "Tableau de l'Opération de la Taille" (the operation for the removal of the bladder stone), the basic program is clear enough: a person is trapped in a maze, and as the person explores the maze, the frustration and confusion of the avenues that are closed off are represented by increasing dissonance and harmonic complexity; whereas, a new path is set forth by an ever-changing ritornello. The final escape from the maze takes the form of a harmonically stable and free-spirited chaconne. The work begins in A Major, and, as the journey progresses, the maze explores the remote keys of F Sharp Minor, C Sharp Major, D Sharp Major, C Minor, and F Major, before using the relative minor, D minor, as an easily accessible pivot point to return to the beginning key of A. Although the work is frequently described as a rondeau, the composition incorporates a few innovative features: the rondeau is not simply repeated, but musically transformed in order to more properly represent a new path: each return to the original theme starts out with the same hopeful affect, but in a different key, summing the experiences of the previous failures in order to eventually solve the puzzle. In this respect, Marias borrows from the previously well-established Italianate principles of ritornello fragmentation and development, but Marais reinvents these techniques to suit the French style. Three-quarters of the way through, at 8:03 in the video, we are presented with a remarkable, musicological “Aha!” moment—the solo viol plays a searching soliloquy, as if suddenly realizing the secret way out of the maze, then kicks up his or her heels through the concluding chaconne, possibly encountering a topiary or two along the way. Marais can thus be tentatively credited with the first instrumental “aha! moment” in the history of music. In composing the Labyrinth, Marais would of course have been familiar with the most famous example, the story of Ariadne, particularly since he had presented his opera (or tragédie en musique) “Ariane et Bacchus” at the Académie Royale de Musique in 1696, and the labyrinth at Versailles was the talk of the town. Although there are a few examples of labyrinth pieces prior to 1717, particularly in German sources, Marais likely developed the concept on his own: with its innovative and original program, its unusual modulations, its fiery technical challenges and brilliant chaconne—a chaconne which could stand alone as a remarkable work— “Le Labyrinthe” is unique in the repertory for solo instruments in the baroque. Perrault's original guide book may be viewed online here: 🤍 And the original prints of Marias' works for viola da gamba are available on IMSLP: 🤍 Visit us on the web at 🤍

Vivaldi Four Seasons: Autumn (Autunno) Full, original version. Carla Moore & Voices of Music RV 293

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The full version of Vivaldi's Autumn, performed on original instruments by the award winning Early Music ensemble Voices of Music. Carla Moore, solo baroque violin. 4K video from our December, 2018, concerto program. Please subscribe to our channel 🤍 All Four Seasons now online! 🤍 For the Four Season, Vivaldi created four different styles of composition for each season. In Autumn, the composer uses a complex, dual ritornello form with the thematic material shared by the soloist. In addition, there are some "surround sound" effects to imitate the sound of the hunters, as short themes are rapidly exchanged across the sound stage. To show the interplay of the soloist and the ripieno, we filmed using ultra wideangle lenses with "deep stage" focus that renders all of the performers clearly. Other innovative compositional elements include moving the rhapsodic adagio for solo violin into the first movement, then providing a second adagio for harpsichord as the middle movement with muted strings. A pianissimo ending concludes the rollicking third movement. The subtitles in this video were written 300 years ago in the form of a sonnet, presumably by Vivaldi, and engraved directly onto the music. You may view the original Italian or an English translation by using the CC button. For this video, a new edition was prepared from the original sources, prints and manuscripts for Vivaldi's music. In Vivaldi's original engraved score, the title is given as the older, Latin word Autumno, not the Italian Autunno. However, in the Manchester partbooks the title is given as Autunno, so we have chosen the more common spelling. You can see the original engraving on IMSLP: 🤍 Visit us on the web at 🤍 Carla Moore plays an 18th century violin by Johann Georg Thir, Vienna, Austria, 1754, one of only a few violins in the world to have remained completely in its original, unaltered form. In the 19th and 20th centuries, almost all baroque violins were modernized which dramatically changes the sound: this is the original sound. The unusual harpsichord solo in the second movement is improvised and performed by Hanneke van Proosdij. Ms van Proosdij plays a harpsichord based on Bartolomeo Cristofori made by Joop Klinkhamer. 0:00 I. Allegro 5:32 II. Adagio molto 7:42 III. Allegro 11:40 Credits #Vivaldi #Autumn #FourSeasons

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